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April 11 2012

18:07

What Do Solar Panel Tariffs Mean For Solar Professionals?


Solar tariffs on Chinese solar panels may cause a bumpy ride in the short term for US solar installers.  This is a followup post to Kriss’ post last week “What Do Solar Panel Tariffs Mean for You?” -ed.

The Commerce Department has found that China provided trade incentives on Chinese made solar panels for the US market, and that this was unfair to US solar panel manufacturers.  The Commerce Department is in turn charging a tariff on all Chinese imports of modules starting this summer.   Here are some answers to help understand the dispute and what it means for solar professionals.

What do trade incentives mean?

The US Commerce Department, through a complaint filed by American solar manufacturer Solar World, charges that the Chinese government subsidized the solar panel market with massive loan incentives, cheaper power costs, and actual cash disbursements.  In the world of international trade, this is considered unfair as it obviously lowered the manufacturing cost for Chinese producers.

Doesn’t the US government give incentives to US solar manufacturers?

The US government over the last 6 years has helped domestic solar production with its own incentives.  But they are very different than what China offered its own manufacturers.  The Department of Energy offered loan guarantees and tax incentives, which essentially made the US government a co-signer on loan applications.  And while it while it may seem like splitting hairs, the Chinese government’s actions had a far greater impact on the actual price of the finished product.

How much are the tariffs?

The tariffs are scaled to punish the biggest violators.  There are as such:

  • Suntech, 2.9 percent
  • Trina 4.73 percent
  • All others, 3.59 percent

But this is likely just the beginning of the tariffs.  The Commerce department is not finished with its review and this decision opens the door to more sanctions.  The US government will review the charges of ‘dumping’ (meaning the industry sold its panels at a loss) in May.  Industry insiders believe (and hope) that the final tariffs will be closer to 10%.

How will this affect solar panel prices?

It is anticipated that prices will rise briefly, and then continue their long descent down.  Many suppliers have spoken of raising prices 10% in April 2012.  Those numbers will move closely with the tariffs.  But the long term economics of solar won’t change drastically, as technology and manufacturing efficiencies continue to drive the price per watt down.  Consumers should not be fearful that the prices will continue to rise.

Why will prices rise now?

Many solar panel manufacturers are operating at or near a loss to compete with the Chinese manufacturers.  This rise in price will better reflect the actual economics of solar panel manufacturing and allow some companies to turn a profit and reinvest in research and development.  The US buys over $3 billion in solar modules from China every year, and more of this money could be directed toward American made products.

So overall is this a good or bad thing for solar?

This will be tough on installers and designers in the short term.  With solar incentives and rebates drying up and labor costs on the rise, this certainly won’t help the economics for home and small business systems.  The best a local installer can do is to explain that now American made products will be more in line with Chinese solar panel costs and that the costs were skewed to begin with due to Chinese government interference.

In the long-term, this will probably be just a bump in the road for solar panel prices and they will likely keep falling over the long-term.  Overall the goal is to achieve grid parity with fossil fuels, and solar is on track to do that in the next decade.

The outlook for solar power is still bright, and with global economic recovery on the way, that outlook will only get better.

——————

Kriss Bergethon is a writer and solar professional from Colorado.  Visit his website at Solar Panels today.

 

 

April 06 2012

17:46

What Do Solar Panel Tariffs Mean For You?


What impact will tariffs on Chinese solar panels have on the US consumer?The Commerce Department has found that China provided trade incentives on Chinese made solar panels for the US market, and that this was unfair to US solar panel manufacturers.  The Commerce Department is in turn charging a tariff on all Chinese imports of modules starting this summer.   Here are some answers to help understand the dispute and what it means for consumers.

 

What do “trade incentives” mean?

The US Commerce Department, through a complaint filed by American solar manufacturer Solar World, charges that the Chinese government subsidized the solar panel market with massive loan incentives, cheaper power costs, and actual cash disbursements.  In the world of international trade, this is considered unfair as it obviously lowered the manufacturing cost for Chinese producers.

Doesn’t the US government give incentives to US solar manufacturers?

The US government over the last 6 years has helped domestic solar production with its own incentives.  But they are very different than what China offered its own manufacturers.  The Department of Energy offered loan guarantees and tax incentives, which essentially made the US government a co-signer on loan applications.  And while it while it may seem like splitting hairs, the Chinese government’s actions had a far greater impact on the actual price of the finished product.

How much are the tariffs?

The tariffs are scaled to punish the biggest violators.  There are as such:

  • Suntech, 2.9 percent
  • Trina 4.73 percent
  • All others, 3.59 percent

But this is likely just the beginning of the tariffs.  The Commerce department is not finished with its review and this decision opens the door to more sanctions.  The US government will review the charges of ‘dumping’ (meaning the industry sold its panels at a loss) in May.  Industry insiders believe (and hope) that the final tariffs will be closer to 10%.

How will this affect solar panel prices?

It is anticipated that prices will rise briefly, and then continue their long descent down.  Many suppliers have spoken of raising prices 10% in April 2012.  But the long term economics of solar won’t change drastically, as technology and manufacturing efficiencies continue to drive the price per watt down.  Consumers should not be fearful that the prices will continue to rise.

Why will prices rise now?

Many solar panel manufacturers are operating at or near a loss to compete with the Chinese manufacturers.  This rise in price will better reflect the actual economics of solar panel manufacturing and allow some companies to turn a profit and reinvest in research and development.  The US buys over $3 billion in solar modules from China every year, and more of this money could be directed toward American made products.

So overall is this a good or bad thing for solar?

Of course everything depends on your perspective, but overall this is likely a good development.  Obviously the US solar makers are cheering this decision, and anyone who is a fan of American manufacturing would do likewise.  In the long term, this will probably be just a bump in the road for solar panel prices and they will likely keep falling over the long term.

The outlook for solar power is still bright, and with global economic recovery on the way, that outlook will only get better.

——————-

Kriss Bergethon is a writer and solar professional from Colorado.  Visit his website at Solar Panels today.

Image courtesy Getty Images 

 

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February 09 2012

23:38

Living Off The Grid With Solar Power Can Be Simple, Fun, and Challenging


The author and his wife in front of their solar-powered home.Guest Post by Kriss Bergethon

My wife and I were desperate to get out of the city.  It was 2007, we were having an extremely stressful year with work.  I owned a small construction company that was just about to give me a heart attack.  She had a job she hated so much she would cry on the way to work sometimes.  On top of all that, we lived in a duplex with noisy neighbors.  And don’t even get me started on the constant, traffic, sirens, and aircraft noise of living in the city.

That’s when we decided: LETS GET OUT OF HERE – FOR GOOD!  So we started looking for homes in the mountains.  And, as luck would have it, we found our dream home after just one day of looking.  Incredible views, astoundingly quiet, on a beautiful lake and surrounded by Aspen-draped mountains, we thought we had died and gone to heaven.  There was just one thing: there was no grid power in this part of the world.

The home was powered with a solar power system and a backup generator.  Heat would have to come from a wood-burning stove.  It wasn’t exactly roughing it, but it was a drastic lifestyle change.  And so, in the dead of winter, we moved our lives to the peace and quiet of Colorado Rockies.  No more walking to sushi on Friday night.  No more rowdy concerts and raucous cab rides on Saturday night.  We still do those things every once in a while but we don’t miss them as much as we thought we would.  And we also don’t have to deal with car break-ins, dirty air, bad water, rude drivers, and traffic jams.

Living off the grid meant we had to make other adjustments too.  The only lights on in the house at night are ones we are actively using.  We started listening to our iPods with headphones instead of throwing on the stereo and cranking the music.  Laundry waits until a sunny day.  Everything is on a power strip and gets turned off at the end of the evening.  We don’t own a toaster, microwave, clothes iron, or hair dryer.

We’ve become acutely aware of the patterns of the sun and weather.  We open the blinds wide to let the sun pour in and heat the house in the winter.  In the warm summer evenings we close them and crack windows strategically to allow the mountains breezes to cool the house.  We’ve installed a wind generator and tuned into the patterns of our breezes too.  Winter mornings might mean shoveling both the driveway and solar panels clear of snow.

Don’t misunderstand, we don’t live like hermits.  We have a large flat screen TV, three computers, plenty of lighting, and tons of entertainment devices.  We just use them strategically to conserve power, always keeping in mind that the sun is our friend.  Up here we find that we need those things less anyway, with all the hiking, skiing, biking, and boating there is to do here.

We’ve learned a lot about solar, living away from civilization, but mostly about ourselves here.  And I can honestly say this is happiest I’ve ever been.

——————-

Kriss Bergethon is a writer and solar expert from Colorado.  You can visit his site at Solar Power for more information.

 

December 15 2011

22:25

How Much Do I Need? An Answer To The Most Common Question in Solar Power


Turning the electric meter backwards with solar powerGuest Post by Kriss Bergethon

We have the pleasure of working with hundreds of people every day that want to reduce their energy bills, go green and jump on the solar power bandwagon.  And the question we see over and over again is: Just how much do I need and what will it cost?  We’ll tackle that question here and show you how we calculate system size and cost.  We have simple solar calculators that can do this on our website but so many people have asked how this is actually calculated we thought we’d give a quick solar design lesson.

Start With the Consumption

We spoke to someone just yesterday that wanted solar panels on a 8’x22’ trailer.  We asked him what his usage was, and his answer floored us.  He was using 7000 kilowatt-hours per month, about 6 times the average household consumption.  As it turns out the trailer was an enormous ice maker.  This illustrates that homes and buildings of all sizes vary widely in their energy consumption.  A 1200 square foot house in Florida might use 3 or 4 times what a similar house in Missouri uses because of air conditioning and different types of HVAC units.

So when planning a solar system, you have to know what you use.  The easiest way to do this is to simply look at your power bill.  You’ll want to look at the “kw-hrs” number, which is short for kilowatt hours.  A kilowatt hour is 1000 watts running for 1 hour.  This number will determine just how many watts are required to almost completely eliminate your power bill.

Factor in Your Location

We also have to account for where you live.  We deal with many customers that live in extremely sunny locations like the southeast and the Caribbean.  But we’ll also get calls from the Northern Territories in Canada where sun exposure is far less.  A 10,000 watt system in Atlanta will generate much more power in a year than a 10,000 watt system in Alaska.   The same is true of locations that are geographically much closer to each other.  For instance Spokane, Washington has almost twice the sun exposure of Seattle, Washington.

To account for sun exposure, weather patterns, and latitude, we use a number called ‘full sun hours’.  This doesn’t mean the hours that the sun is in the sky, but is a weighted number that helps us determine how a solar panel system will typically perform in a given area.  Most of the US has a number between 3 and 5.  Some areas close to the equator have a number closer to 7.  The solar exposure map is below:

Solar Exposure Map

Now Calculate Wattage Produced

So now we have the basic information that can help us get a rough idea of what a system will look like.  Here’s a simple formula that will get you close to your number:

Monthly Consumption (kw-hrs)=Rough solar kilowatts

(30 x Sun-hours for your area x .80 to account for efficiencies)

Now an installer will tell you that does not account for things like shading, angle of solar panels, etc., and they would be right.  But for rough calculation this will suffice.

Now Calculate a Rough Installed Cost

We have determined a general system size, let’s crunch some numbers to see what this will cost.  Installed solar costs vary widely across the country, but a good rule of thumb these days is equipment and installation for a standard grid tie, roof mount system will cost between $4 and $5 per watt.  So if we take the average of that number and the result of the previous calculation:

Rough solar kilowatts x 1000 x $4.50/watt = Rough solar cost estimate.

Now the installed cost per watt can vary for any number of reasons:

  • Difficult installation
  • Higher labor rates
  • Inadequate roof space
  • Remote location
  • Travel time for installers
  • Special equipment requirements
  • Special building code requirements

But, for most people, this will give them a good idea of what solar power will cost for grid tied systems.  And of course this does not account for incentives at the local, state and federal level.  In many areas where installation is more expensive (such as both the East and the West coast) incentives are also higher.

Now you can take on the next important question:  Where am I going to put all these solar panels?

——————

Kriss Bergethon is a solar expert and writer from Colorado, visit his site at Solar Panels for more information.

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October 06 2011

18:52

Eight Amazing Things About Solar Panels That Could Change the World


How Solar Panels Can Change the WorldGuest post by Kriss Bergethon

Green energy is one of the most rapidly expanding industries in the world right now due to so many people looking to do their part to help save the planet. With so much focus on solving global warming and reducing air pollution, smarter and cleaner forms of energy are being looked at very closely by scientists and consumers. There are several cool facts about solar power that can change the world.

  1. The Reduction in Prices for Solar Panels
    One of the biggest reasons people avoided solar power in the past is that it was too expensive and inefficient to be worth their time. Coal has been up to 90% less expensive to use as an energy source over the years, which made other options ineffective. Prices on solar panels have dropped up to 30% in some cases and have come down to the $4/watt range.
  2. The Development of Solar Film
    Rather than using the traditional solar panels, a few companies have started to put out solar film. Film is cheaper to make than panels because it is printed out in rolls while standard panels are manufactured like microchips. The prices on solar film seem to be coming out at roughly $2/watt, which is 50% less expensive than panels.
  3. Increase in Efficiency for Panels
    Solar panels typically ran at an efficiency level of around 15%, which is measured by the difference between how much sun hits the panel and how much energy comes out of it. Solar energy has become more efficient in recent years, and newer panels are putting out 22% more consistently.
  4. Increase in Efficiency for Films
    Thin films have greatly increased in efficiency as well. Films consistently used to have about 10% efficiency, but with improvements in technology the films have bumped up their efficiency to about 15%, which makes them more worth the money.
  5. Utility Scale Solar Power
    Solar power can now be delivered through utility companies instead of just through panels mounted on a home or building. This enables power facilities to use mirrors and advanced panels to obtain maximum energy from the sun and transmit it to homes and businesses.
  6. Increased Price for Traditional Power
    As prices for traditional power like coal and fossil fuels continue to rise, people will continue to develop alternative energy sources. Solar energy is the most abundant resource that should be tapped, and increased cost will lead to more research and development.
  7. Research for Advancements
    Research drives projects like solar power to greater heights. When research is funded, things like efficiency go up for these panels and make it more affordable for everyone. The government is funding projects like solar power to clean up the environment.
  8. Investment of Time and Money
    Silicon Valley venture capital is involved in significant investments for the solar energy field. Programs are being granted the money and opportunities needed to advance solar power to a new level. Investment increases the rate of development for solar power.

——————-
Kriss Bergethon is a solar expert and writer from Colorado.  Visit his site at Solar Panels for more information.

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September 12 2011

22:28

Enviro News Wrap: Solyndra and the Chinese; Dirty Data Centers; Greenwashing Natural Gas, and more…


The Latest Environmental News HeadlinesGlobalWarmingisReal contributor Anders Hellum-Alexander wraps-up the climate and environmental news headlines for the past week:

Solydndra and the Chinese PV solar market:

 

September 01 2011

19:22

Falling Solar Panel Costs Are Great For Buyers, Bad for Producers


Solar panel prices are dropping fast, making for a thin profit margin for manufacturersGuest post by Kriss Bergethon

A recent industry analysis projects the amount of solar power installed to grow to 15.5 percent per year, but revenues are to stay flat until 2016. Lux Research provided the report. A report from Navigant Consulting discovered that the price of solar panels is down almost 20 percent as of August 2011. The information derived from these two reports show that the consumer is poised to benefit from the price reduction while manufacturers can expect an almost flat profit margin for the next few years.

Manufacturers of solar panels are in a constant price competition. This literally boils down to shaving price per watt by pennies in order to beat out competitors. The reports mean shrinking profit margins with concerns over demand for panels staying strong. Manufacturing capacity for solar hardware is increasing, but the unknown factor is if there will be enough buyers to consume the increased output.

Consumers stand to benefit from the softening in prices as it translates into more solar capacity for the same amount. The lower prices give rise to the idea that solar leasing, an alternative to purchasing panels outright, may gain more traction. However, lower prices go beyond that. A solar industry analyst feels there is an ultimate benefit in the falling prices. It makes solar power leasing viable in states that have been written off in the past.Solar power leasing is designed to provide an alternative to purchasing a solar panel array upfront. Instead of buying the solar panels, consumers pay a monthly fee that reduces their electric bill. In a lease situation, a predetermined fee is set for 20 years. The consumer can also participate in a power purchase arrangement; the consumer buys power from the solar panels. A purchase arrangement is cheaper than buying from traditional grid suppliers.

A consumer can expect to pay $30,000 for the purchase and installation of a complete rooftop solar power array. A 30 percent federal tax rebate and possible state incentives serve to lower the cost. The solar panels make up less than half of the total price, with the rest of the cost going towards labor and necessary hardware. Consumers are going to see little, if any, benefit in the price competition from producers. The price change is going to be seen mainly by installers and solar power lease companies.

It is thought that solar power has the potential to reach what is known as “grid parity,” wherein the cost of solar power is cheaper than traditional grid suppliers. This theory can become reality if the price of solar panels continues their precipitous price drops.

Lux Research projects that grid parity will reach commercial solar panel installations first, and that ten countries will reach that point by 2016. For the time being, state subsidies and the cost of retail power are key to allowing solar power to undercut grid power. Anticipated increases in the cost of wholesale and retail electricity will serve to increase demand for solar power.

——————-

Kriss Bergethon is a solar expert and writer from Colorado.  Visit his site at Solar Panels for more information.

 

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July 12 2011

16:03

Solar Power: The Path to Parity


The Path to Parity

Solar panel technology has changed little since it’s inception in 1894. Certain refinements have increased output and produced higher efficiencies, while the technology surrounding battery technology has improved our ability to store the energy collected. What has really changed is the cost per watt in comparison to the cost of competitive renewable and non-renewable energies.

And now, with so many solar companies offering lease programs, the cost of installing solar on your home or business has dropped so significantly, it can often be purchased with no money down and might even drop your monthly electric bill.

Path to Parity: infographic on history of solar technology

Infographic by SunRun – Home Solar Leasing Made Easy

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July 05 2011

00:58

G.E. Bursts into the Solar Panel Field Equipped to Succeed


GE enters the thin-film solar panel market in a big wayGuest Post by Kriss Bergethon

General Electric is planning the largest solar panel factory in the United States, looking to get into the growing “green” industry in a big way, and on an accelerated timeline.

According to Victor Abate, vice president for G.E.’s renewable energy business, the news follows G.E.’s ongoing investments in solar panels, and takes their efforts to a much larger scale than ever before.

G.E. is leveraging their presence in Colorado, setting up the factory there, and bringing direct and indirect employment to about 1,000 people. The new factory will provide employment for 400 workers and create 600 jobs in related business nearby.

Having acquired Arvada-based PrimeStar Solar Inc., G.E. is off to a running start with a factory that is already tooled for highly economical thin-film solar panels. The panels are certified by the National Renewable Energy Lab as the most efficient of their kind. The factory will manufacture thin-film photovoltaic panels, made of cadmium telluride, by 2013.

Cadmium telluride panels are less efficient than ordinary ones, but can be produced at a lower cost. G.E. will manufacture the most efficient cadmium telluride panels currently possible, and because of the relatively low expense, expects to produce a high volume annually. There is a healthy market for cadmium telluride panels among utility providers and other large-scale operators.

With this announcement, G.E. is signaling again that it is serious about increasing its energy business. G.E. already holds large stakes in nuclear power and natural gas. Recent expansion in these energy sources has been largely through acquisitions.

According to Abate, G.E. will be a cost leader and a technology leader. “We’re excited about our position in a 75 gigawatt solar market over the next five years,” he added.

G.E. is not alone in pursing the solar panel business, which is very competitive. One major player is Arizona-based First Solar, the market leader in thin-film panel manufacturing. Abound Solar, another competitor, is rapidly adding manufacturing capacity for its cadmium telluride panels. The company recently took out a $400 million federal loan guarantee to fund their expansion.

G.E. won’t be applying for federal loan guarantees like Abound Solar has. Instead, they plan to explore state and federal manufacturing tax credits to expand as needed.

G.E.’s manufacturing roll-out will be small compared to First Solar’s level of production. G.E.’s Abate said his company’s solar efforts can grow swiftly, as happened with their wind energy business. Abate told the New York Times, “It’s a $6 billion platform and it was a couple of hundred million dollars in ’02,” regarding G.E.’s wind division. “G.E. is very good at scale. In ’05, we were building 10 turbines a week. By ’08, we were doing 13 a day.”

G.E. faces competition from low-cost, government-subsidized Chinese manufacturers. Without similar cash subsidies available to them in the U.S., G.E. will deal with low cost international competitors as it does already in the wind business.

——————

Kriss Bergethon is a writer and solar expert from Colorado, visit his site at Solar Panels

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Reposted by02mydafsoup-01 02mydafsoup-01

May 19 2011

22:03

More Efficient and Affordable Solar Power: Developments that are Changing the Industry


Advances in solar inverter technology is helping make solar power more efficient and affordableGuest post by Kriss Bergethon

Solar power was discovered over 170 years ago, but it didn’t become a viable technology until the 1950s. The high cost of producing solar cells meant that the concept remained in limited use up until recently. Renewed interest in solar power has brought investment and research that vastly improved the collection capacity of the cells. The following are three innovations that have lowered the cost, increased efficiency and made obtaining a setup that much easier.

  1. Thin-Film Solar Collection Cells Can Cut Costs by Half
    Ask anyone what they think a solar power system looks like. Most likely their response will be that it is a large, window-like set up that has black panels set on a frame. This is the most well-known type of solar collection system, known as crystalline panels. These panels kept the overall costs high, as they require a high degree of quality control to build.Thin film solar cells are nothing like the crystalline panels. They are thin and flexible, often shipped rolled up. Manufacturing a panel is akin to printing on paper, which has reduced the price of an individual cell. Ease of construction has brought the price of a thin-film panel costs around $1 a watt. Compare that to the cost of crystalline panels, which cost in the $2 a watt range.
  2. Micro-Inverters Increase the Affordability of Solar Power Systems
    The inverter is the lynchpin of a solar power setup. Power that is generated from the solar panels is direct current (DC), and needs to be converted into alternating current (AC). The inverter does the job of current conversion. It is a necessary item because most household appliances run off AC, and cannot operate on DC.Inverters on old systems were expensive, bulky and created a lot of excess heat. The price of the least expensive unit pushed the overall cost of a modest solar power setup to more than $10,000. 

    The invention of microinverters has reduced the startup cost of a solar power system to around $1,000, one-tenth the price of a traditional setup. This drastic price drop has opened up access to more people who want a small solar power system, but couldn’t afford it otherwise.

  3. New Panel Rack Systems have Decreased the Overall Cost of Installation
    A large portion of the cost for a solar power setup is the labor that goes into mounting the solar panel racks. Installing the bolts into the roof, then setting up the panel rails is a tedious and time-consuming job.

New racking systems have come onto the market, ones that eliminate most of the labor. These new systems are installed in much less time, saving the consumer money.

The cost of solar power installations has come down dramatically in the past few years. In the coming years, consumers will most likely see even larger drops in cost. Renewable energy such as solar power has the potential to compete with fossil fuels in the near future.

——————–

Kriss Bergethon is a solar professional and writer from Colorado.  Visit his site at Solar Panels for more information.

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May 03 2011

14:34

Enviro News Wrap: French Solar Investment; Climategate Retrospective; Japan’s Energy Future, and more…


The latest environmental news headlinesGlobalWarmingisReal contributor Anders Hellum-Alexander wraps-up the climate and environmental news headlines for the past week:

The largest oil company in France, Total, bought 60% of SunPower, one of the largest PV solar panel manufacturers in the world. As other large oil companies drift away from investments in alternative energy Total is diving right in.

There are too many types of organisms on earth to count, but some still try and they find new species all the time.

As we change how we produce and use energy our lifestyles will change too. New York Times reports on residents of New Jersey adjusting to solar panels in their neighborhood.

MotherJones revisits Climategate in a post-perspective story.

Japan has relied on nuclear power for decades. Recent events have shown a need for other energy sources. Wind power has been difficult to harvest on the island with traditional wind turbines, but newer designs are making wind power more viable.

New York City is covering old landfills with solar panels, how wonderful.

The moment has come; you can now buy a “Green” yacht. The technologies it utilizes should be used on commercial vehicles, but the vehicle itself is a floating oxymoron.

Of the many changes that climate change will bring, one of them will be decreased river flow in the Western US. With all the controversy over rivers already less water will just escalate the situation.

National Geographic covers a fuel efficiency car competition with great photo coverage.

Al Gore now has his own Global Warming Ap and a video to show it off. Check it out.

Grist shows off a Sierra Club map of coal-fired power plants in the US and asks the question, “is there one near you.”

 

March 20 2010

22:02

Solar Power For Homes

Christine Douglas asked:

Are you interested in solar power for homes? Are you wondering what choices you have in selecting solar power? There are so many options and ways to get solar power working for you. Don’t feel limited in acquiring solar energy for your family. This article will review the many ways you can get solar power for your home. You’ll be powering your life with the sun’s rays in no time at all.

There are many options when it comes to solar power for homes. And these options include many different home specifications. Perhaps you are a rural resident? Solar power on farms is becoming popular. Not only can you help the environment, but many farmers find that the energy they receive in the traditional way is not as reliable as they’d like based on their location. With solar power on your barn, shed, or farm house, you’ll always have the power you need, when you need it.

If you are a city resident, you may find it a little harder to use solar power for homes. This is especially true if you are living in a large apartment complex. But there are still solar power options available to you! Many companies these days are manufacturing small, portable, solar power systems. These have a solar panel attached to a box, battery and outlet. They can power anything that can plug in. Place one on your patio or rooftop, and then use it to power your TV! Or take it camping for true convenience while you’re in the great outdoors. There are also manual powered systems available if you do not have a lot of sunlight. These are equipped similarly, but with a manual pump instead of a solar panel.

In addition to the usual solar power for homes, many cities are offering residents the option of purchasing solar generated power through the traditional grid. These projects are still in their infancy and are not yet widely available, but many people believe they are the future of energy. These are usually set up with very large solar panels away from homes and cities to generate power. It can then be piped in to be used just like the traditional power. Some areas also offer residents the option of purchasing power generated through wind sources. Check with your local power company to learn if any of these options are available to people in your area.

Solar power for homes can be quite expensive to install. Of course, over time you will end up saving money, but if you don’t quite have the upfront costs for solar power installation, you should know about government rebates. There are many tax credits available for individuals who have installed solar power in their home. Check with your local and national government’s websites to learn of the rebates available to you.

Solar power

Read more on Solar Power For Homes…

Energy Tags: battery technology, clean energy

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