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July 29 2012

20:13

How Do You Spend $375 Million A Day? Ask The Oil Industry

The average U.S. household has seen both their net worth and their average income steadily decline over the last seven years. Unemployment in the United States still remains at uncomfortably high levels, and the poverty rate is about to reach highs that haven’t been seen since the 1960’s. But as average citizens are struggling to provide food for their families and gainful employment, there are a special few in the U.S.A. who have more cash than they know what to do with. Those special few would be the oil industry.

While most of us in the U.S. were cringing every time that ticker on the gas pump climbed higher and higher, executives at the top five oil companies were squealing with delight as their profits climbed even faster and higher than the prices at the pump.

This week, oil companies are sheepishly coming forward with their 2nd quarter earnings statements, likely praying that Americans forget about the fact that gas prices were recently at near-historic highs in areas of the country. From Climate Progress:
  

The top two corporations on the Fortune 500 Global ranking, Royal Dutch Shell and ExxonMobil, announced their 2012 second-quarter earnings today, bringing the total profits for three Big Oil companies to $44 billion for 2012 or $250,000 every day this year. Exxon profited by $16 billion this quarter, bringing its earnings for 2012 to $25 billion.

The New York Times wrote that Exxon and Shell’s earnings “disappoint,” because energy prices unexpectedly dropped for consumers this summer. Put their profits in the appropriate context, however, and Exxon and Shell still made a combined $160,000 per minute last quarter, even though the top five oil companies benefit from $2.4 billion federal tax breaks every year.
 

That certainly warrants repeating: Exxon and Shell made a combined $160,000 every minute for the last quarter, and still helped themselves to a piece of the $2.4 billion in federal tax breaks and subsidies that flow to the top five oil companies (the grand total for all members of the industry is estimated to be between $4 and $7 billion a year.)

At their current rate of pay by the minute, they are on track to beat their record from last year when the top five oil companies combined earned a total of $261,000 every minute, for a grand total of $375 million a day.

So the ultimate question is how do they spend all that money? The simplest answer is that they spend most of it in ways that only makes them wealthier. Again from Climate Progress:
  

ExxonMobil:

Exxon spent 42 percent — or $10.7 billion — of its 2012 profits buying back its stock, which enriches executives and largest shareholders.

Exxon has spent $17 million lobbying for the past 18 months, making it the top spender in the oil and gas industry. It has spent more than $52 million lobbying for the first three years of the Obama presidency, 50 percent more than in the Bush administration.

Exxon is sitting on $18 billion in cash reserves.

Exxon sent federal candidates $1.3 million in campaign contributions so far this campaign cycle, sending 91 percent to Republicans.

Exxon paid just 13 percent in federal taxes last year, lower than the average American family. Right after Mitt Romney, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is the top recipient of Exxon federal contributions.

Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson received $24.7 million total compensation.

Royal Dutch Shell:

Shell has spent nearly $22 million on lobbying for the past 18 months, making it the second-biggest spender of the oil and gas industry.

Shell bought back 15 percent of its second-quarter profits, or $900 million.

In its annual report, Shell noted that the number of oil spills increased from 195 in 2010 to 207 during 2011.
 

But Exxon and Shell aren’t the only companies to report massive paydays this week; ConocoPhillips is also apparently rolling in the dough. Here’s how they spent their $2.3 billion in 2nd quarter profits:
  

ConocoPhillips has already spent $1 million lobbying Congress this year. In 2011, ConocoPhillips spent over $20 million on lobbying Congress, making it the top spender of the oil and gas industry.

Conoco has contributed nearly $400,000 to federal campaigns this year, with 90 percent of the contributions going to Republicans.

Conoco is sitting on $1 billion in cash reserves.

The company spent 35 percent more than they earned this quarter — or $3.1 billion — buying back its own stock, which enriches the largest shareholders and executives.
 

Obviously, there’s nothing wrong with a company being profitable. The problem is that the oil industry is profitable at the expense of our national economy and our environment. Oil spills in recent years have cost billions of dollars – money that is coming from U.S. taxpayers – and the ridiculous prices at the pump are taking a huge toll on American families.

And again, at the same time these companies are reaping these profits, we’re giving them an extra $7 billion tip every year. And as long as they keep pulling in these massive profits, they’ll have enough money to pay off the right politicians to keep those billions in subsidies in place. Last year, the total amount spent on lobbying topped $30 million by the oil industry in order to preserve their subsidies, which netted them a whopping 42% return on their investment.

March 03 2012

00:50

U.S. Chamber Hits The Road To Promote "Oily" Highway Transportation Bill

A bitter fight has erupted in Washington, D.C. in recent weeks surrounding the fate of a much-needed transportation and infrastructure bill. Congressional Democrats wanted to pass a bill that would fund projects to help rebuild roads and bridges, but Republicans were against the idea.

So, in an attempt to get something more tangible out of the legislation, Congressional Republicans loaded the bill down with dozens of handouts to the oil industry, including immediate approval of the Keystone XL pipeline and expanded access to U.S. lands for oil exploration. The amendments would also take national gas tax money away from public transportation projects, and reduce the amount of federal contributions to public employee pensions – two actions that will have devastating effects on middle class America. And with the fight bringing the discussion on the legislation to a halt, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce took it upon themselves to hit the road and sell the bill to the American public.

From the U.S. Chamber:

The business group will be hosting breakfasts, lunches and policy roundtables with local chambers and business associations this week in 12 different cities in Ohio, Idaho, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama and Louisiana.

Janet Kavinoky, the Chamber’s executive director of transportation and infrastructure, will be on the road trip, along with Alex Herrgott, one of the business group’s transportation lobbyists.

“The idea is to get out, give people a good sense what the bill is and get them talking to their members of Congress and have them get the bill done,” Kavinoky said. “We want Congress to feel like it needs to come back to Washington and get the bill done and put it to bed.”

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