Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

October 10 2019

15:32

Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen

The human fetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb. Using a new analytical method, it was shown that the xenoestrogen migrates through the placenta and is partially converted to other harmful substances.
15:32

New study analyzes FEMA-funded home buyout program

An analysis of FEMA's 30-year-old property buyout program offers new insight into the growing debate on managed retreat -- moving people and assets out of flood-prone areas.
13:57

Solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle

New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. At issue is how much of the CO2 that entered the ocean during ice ages can be attributed to the 'biological pump', where atmospheric carbon is absorbed by phytoplankton and sequestered to the seafloor as organisms die and sink.
12:57

Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected

Researchers show that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought.
12:57

Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds

New research shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. Original modeling by ecologists shows the potential impacts to the petrel's population if mice are allowed to remain. The super-abundant mice encourage migrating burrowing owls to stay on the island, who later in the winter switch from eating mice to preying on the petrels.

October 09 2019

20:24

Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have shown that nanoparticles may have a bigger impact on the environment than previously thought.
20:24

Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming

New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change.
18:29

Warm ocean water attacking edges of Antarctica's ice shelves

Upside-down 'rivers' of warm ocean water are eroding the fractured edges of thick, floating Antarctic ice shelves from below, helping to create conditions that lead to ice-shelf breakup and sea-level rise, according to a new study. The findings describe a new process important to the future of Antarctica's ice and the continent's contribution to rising seas. Models and forecasts do not yet account for the newly understood and troubling scenario, which is already underway.
18:28

Meet Siamraptor suwati, a new species of giant predatory dinosaur from Thailand

Fossils discovered in Thailand represent a new genus and species of predatory dinosaur, according to a new study.
17:24

Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish

Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. This phenomenon, known as brood parasitism, was unknown in coral reef fish because most marine fish don't provide any parental care at all. Now, however, biologists studying an unusual kind of coral reef fish that does care for its young have found that, sure enough, other fish are taking advantage of this to get free parental care for their offspring.
17:24

Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish

Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. This phenomenon, known as brood parasitism, was unknown in coral reef fish because most marine fish don't provide any parental care at all. Now, however, biologists studying an unusual kind of coral reef fish that does care for its young have found that, sure enough, other fish are taking advantage of this to get free parental care for their offspring.
17:23

Hush, little baby: Mother right whales 'whisper' to calves

A recent study explores whether right whale mother-calf pairs change their vocalizations to keep predators from detecting them.
17:17

Single-particle spectroscopy of CsPbBr3 perovskite reveals the origin low electrolumine

Researchers have used the method of single-particle spectroscopy to study electroluminescence in light-emitting devices. They discovered that efficient charge funneling between individual perovskite nanocrystals and the phenomenon of emission blinking are responsible for the low efficiencies of perovskite light-emitting devices.
17:17

Chemical evolution -- One-pot wonder

Before life, there was RNA: Scientists show how the four different letters of this genetic alphabet could be created from simple precursor molecules on early Earth -- under the same environmental conditions.
17:17

No soil left behind: How a cost-effective technology can enrich poor fields

Many farmers across sub-Saharan Africa try to coax crops out of sandy soils that are not ideal for holding water and nutrients. Traditional approaches would have them apply more fertilizers and use irrigation, but both require access to resources and infrastructure that many do not have. A relatively new technology modeled for eight African countries, and currently being tested in Zimbabwe, shows potential for improving harvests through increased water retention and accumulation of organic material.
14:53

CRISPR-BEST prevents genome instability

Scientists have developed CRISPR-BEST, a new genome editing tool for actinomycetes. It addresses the problem of genome instability caused by DNA double-stranded breaks in current CRISPR-technologies.
14:11

How to make biocatalysts immortal

Oxygen threatens sustainable catalysts that use hydrogen to produce electricity in fuel cells. Researchers have now developed a way to combat this.
13:58

Liquifying a rocky exoplanet

A hot, molten Earth would be around 5% larger than its solid counterpart. The difference between molten and solid rocky planets is important for the search of Earth-like worlds beyond our Solar System and the understanding of Earth itself.
13:39

New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest

Scientists have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. Parasitoid wasps are among the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. Recently, the research group sampled Afrotropical rhyssine wasps, which are among the largest wasps.
12:25

Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019: Lithium-ion batteries

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019 is being awarded to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham, and Akira Yoshino "for the development of lithium-ion batteries."
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl