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October 07 2019

14:04

Particles emitted by consumer 3D printers could hurt indoor air quality

The particles emitted from 3D printers can negatively impact indoor air quality and have the potential to harm respiratory health, according to a new study.
12:17

The last mammoths died on a remote island

Isolation, extreme weather, and the possible arrival of humans may have killed off the holocene herbivores just 4,000 years ago.

October 04 2019

19:52

Household bleach inactivates chronic wasting disease prions

A 5-minute soak in a 40% solution of household bleach decontaminated stainless steel wires coated with chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions, according to a new study. The scientists used the wires to model knives and saws that hunters and meat processors use when handling deer, elk and moose - all of which are susceptible to CWD.
14:56

Dust in ice cores leads to new knowledge on the advancement of the ice before the ice age

Working with the ice core ReCap, drilled close to the coast in East Greenland, researchers wondered why the dust particles from the interglacial period -- the warmer period of time between the ice ages -- were several times bigger than the dust particles from the ice age. The research led to the invention of a method able to map the advancement of the glaciers in cold periods and the melting in warmer periods.
14:56

Antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater

The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. Researchers studied and compared samples from an advanced groundwater treatment facility in California and groundwater aquifers to detect differences in ARG concentrations. They found that the advanced groundwater treatment facility reduced nearly all targeted ARGs to below detection limits, but groundwater samples had a ubiquitous presence of ARGs in both control locations and locations recharged with water from the advanced water treatment facility.
14:56

Sinking groundwater levels threaten the vitality of riverine ecosystems

Groundwater is the world's largest source of freshwater and it is of vital importance for food production. Increasing extraction of groundwater in recent decades has resulted in sinking water tables worldwide. A study by a hydrologist shows that almost 20 percent of the catchments areas where groundwater is pumped suffer from a flow that is too low to sustain freshwater ecosystems. This number is expected to increase to 50 percent by 2050.
11:48

Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?

Chemists have found that deliquescent minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from humid air, can assist the construction of proteins from simpler building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth.

October 03 2019

20:25

How much are you polluting your office air just by existing?

Could your basic acts of existence be polluting the air in the office room where you work? To find out, a team of engineers has been conducting one of the largest studies of its kind.
18:15

Implanted memories teach birds a song

A new songbird study that shows memories can be implanted in the brain to teach vocalizations -- without any lessons from the parent.
18:15

Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution

Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from -- but not drive -- rapid diversification of ants into new species.
18:15

Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution

Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from -- but not drive -- rapid diversification of ants into new species.
18:09

Living with fire risk is not easy

A research team has outlined governance and policy approaches to better manage wildfires.
17:57

Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'

New research shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests.
17:57

Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs

By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, biologists discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species.
17:31

How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travelers

Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study has found.
17:03

Managed forests in New Hampshire rich in carbon

A new study examining carbon stocks in an actively managed mixed wood forest in New Hampshire finds that places with more trees have more carbon stored in both the trees and the soil. The findings demonstrate the connection between above ground and below ground carbon, which has implications for forest management strategies.
15:40

Laser precision: NASA flights, satellite align over sea ice

The skies were clear, the winds were low, and the lasers aligned. In April, instruments aboard NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne campaign and the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 succeeded in measuring the same Arctic sea ice at the same time, a tricky feat given the shifting sea ice.
15:40

Northern forests have lost crucial cold, snowy conditions

Winter conditions are changing more rapidly than any other season and researchers have found clear signs of a decline in frost days, snow covered days and other indicators of winter that could have lasting impacts on ecosystems, water supplies, the economy, tourism and human health.
15:40

Exposure to air pollution increases violent crime rates

Breathing dirty air can make you sick. But according to new research, it can also make you more aggressive. That's the conclusion from a set of studies recently authored by Colorado State University researchers. The team found strong links between short-term exposure to air pollution and aggressive behavior, in the form of aggravated assaults and other violent crimes across the continental United States.
15:17

How the Texas puma saved the Florida panther

Scientists have pieced together the first complete picture of the Florida panther genome -- work that could serve to protect that endangered population and other endangered species going forward.
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