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July 20 2018

19:49

Sahara dust may make you cough, but it's a storm killer

The bad news: Dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa -- totaling a staggering 2 to 9 trillion pounds worldwide -- has been almost a biblical plague on Texas and much of the Southern United States in recent weeks. The good news: the same dust appears to be a severe storm killer.
15:28

Wave energy converters are not geared towards the increase in energy over the last century

Wave energy converters are designed to generate the maximum energy possible in their location and take a typical year in the location as a reference. Researchers have been exploring how ocean energy in Ireland has evolved during the last century. The results reveal an increase of up to 40%, which directly affects the output of the converters.
15:28

Houseplants could one day monitor home health

A student from two unrelated disciplines -- plant sciences and architectural design -- explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. Their idea is to genetically engineer house plants to serve as subtle alarms that something is amiss in our home and office environments.
15:28

Greening vacant lots reduces feelings of depression in city dwellers

Greening vacant urban land significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, researchers show in a new randomized, controlled study. The findings have implications for cities across the United States, where 15 percent of land is deemed ''vacant'' and often blighted or filled with trash and overgrown vegetation.
13:25

Sea pickles are adapting to the Pacific Northwest

Tubular colonial jellies known as pyrosomes that arrived in 2014 along North America's Pacific Northwest Coast appear to be adapting to cooler water and may become permanent residents.
13:25

Scientists identify most pressing issues posed by chemicals in the environment

Chemicals released into the environment by human activity are resulting in biodiversity loss; increased natural hazards; threats to food, water and energy security; negative impacts on human health and degradation of environmental quality. Now, an international study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry involving scientists from the University of York has identified the 22 most important research questions that need to be answered to fill the most pressing knowledge gaps over the next decade.

July 19 2018

20:50

New solar sailing technology for NASA

Researchers is taking solar sailing to the next level with advanced photonic materials. This new class of materials could be used to steer reflected or transmitted photons and enable near-Earth, interplanetary and interstellar space travel.
20:50

New battery could store wind and solar electricity affordably and at room temperature

A new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.
18:21

Rapid cloud clearing phenomenon could provide another piece of climate puzzle

Researchers have described rapid and dramatic clearing of low cloud cover off the southwest coast of Africa. This newly observed phenomenon could help climatologists understand how clouds affect Earth's heating and cooling.
18:21

Deep-diving scientists say shallow reefs can't rely on twilight zone systems for recovery

A team of highly trained scientific divers explored Pacific and western Atlantic reefs to test a widely held hypothesis that climate-stressed life from shallow reefs can take refuge at mesophotic depths (100-500 feet beneath the ocean's surface). The results are clear: deep and shallow reefs are different systems with their own species, and deep reefs are just as threatened by climate impacts, storms, and pollution.
18:20

From cradle to grave: Factors that shaped evolution

This study brings us closer to knowing the complex interactions between topography and climate change, and how these factors influence the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of species in natural ecosystems.
16:18

Vast majority of Americans support Endangered Species Act despite increasing efforts to curtail it

Roughly four out of five Americans support the Endangered Species Act, and only one in 10 oppose it, found a survey of 1,287 Americans. Support has remained stable for the past two decades.
16:17

Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Oil biodegradation inhibited in deep-sea sediments

Degradation rates of oil were slower in the dark and cold waters of the depths of the Gulf of Mexico than at surface conditions, according to an international team of geoscientists trying to understand where the oil went during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
15:22

Scientists use satellites to measure vital underground water resources

With the hope of providing water resource managers with better tools to help keep aquifers healthy, a team of scientists are using the latest space technology to look underneath Earth's surface to measure this precious natural resource.
15:22

Determining the bioaccumulation of 9 metals in aquatic invertebrates in mining areas

A new study has proposed an ecological threshold concentration of 9 metals for 10 taxa of aquatic macroinvertebrates from clean sites in the Nalón river basin (Asturias). This is the first step towards incorporating into river management plans quality criteria relating to the bioaccumulation of hazardous substances, as required by the EU.
15:22

Sudden cold weather may increase stroke mortality

Study conducted in Southern Hemisphere's subtropical zone detects correlation between drop in temperature and rise in deaths from stroke, especially among women and older people.
14:12

A social tool for evaluating the environmental impact of residential buildings

for the first time, an open-source computing tool can, simply and intuitively, calculate the CO2 emissions in each phase of a building project, in order to obtain a global picture of its carbon footprint from its conception and to help decide every variable in the construction process.
14:12

Monkeys benefit from the nut-cracking abilities of chimpanzees and hogs

Researchers describe for the first time the scavenging behavior of mangabey monkeys, guinea fowls, and squirrels on energy-rich nut remnants cracked by chimpanzees and red river hogs. The team used data collected by camera traps in the rain forest of Tai National Park in Ivory Coast. The results reveal new unknown interactions between different species and increase our understanding of the complex community of animals foraging around tropical nut trees.
12:54

Expected sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

Scientists have shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-ton iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimeters to sea-level rise. The break-up of the smaller George VI Ice Shelf would have a much larger impact.
12:54

Colombia peace deal brings new threat to country's rainforest

The historic peace treaty in Colombia which brought an end to half a century of violence has led to mass deforestation. Once FARC soldiers were disarmed, it led to a vacuum of power which is being exploited by large landowners who are now deforesting the area at an alarming rate to make way for farms and for the illegal growth of coca crops. An ecologically significant region of Colombia, is now at risk of disappearing.
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